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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
. martin luther king jr. andrew seattle who is with the freedom from religion foundation. mr. stittle, abraham lincoln and dr. king too two amazing american icons you want to take their bibles and remove them from the ceremony. >> i much prefer dr. king's writing on the letter from the birmingham jail where he talks about the white church standing on the sideline mouthing trivialalities and pyes irrelevancy while he does the work of the civil rights movement. >> bill: you must know that dr. king invoked god in almost every speech that he made. >> article 2 section one of the constitution which lays out the oath does not say anything about the word so help me god. it says i will preserve to the best of my ability, preserve, defend and protect the states period. it's kind of ironic that the president is going to amend that in the middle of it. >> bill: do you know why george washington wanted the words god so help me god in? do you know why? >> george washington did not say so help me god. the first recorded instance is 1801. >> bill: if you look at his inaugural address it's peppered w
sense is that regardless of culture, race religion try some commonality. these essential human truth compassion and hope some moral precepts are universal. just go and somebody is another variation he said in the speech that made famous in the 2004 keynote address at the democratic national convention in boston, where he said there's a red states blue states, but the united states. he presented himself as the personification of that notion. his presidency has been a rude awakening in terms of how far you can take that. so he has been dealing with that. the promise and frustrations of that idea ever sense. as i'm sure we'll both be experiencing the telephone calls, for the show. >> host: your book ends in 1989, "barack obama: the story." he said there's another volume coming? >> guest: added y2k committed to 40 years of robert caro, so assertive cat that on the down low, but i had every intention and i've done a lot of reporting that the later years, which influences the book even though they're not in it. and i don't want to do a quickie. i tried a rate for history documents coming o
is the redneck americans clinging to their guns and religion. 99% of the gun violence is in the city. >> bob: they have three strikes you're out. >> greg: i'm talking about a federal law for handgun crime. why isn't omar abdel-rahman rahg about the 500 people that died in chicago. >> eric: he is inses tent to use the newtown massacre as the crisis that is not to be wasted. >> bob: not a bad idea either. the kids and you are talking actually about the national rifle -- freddie how many dead kids in philadelphia? >> kimberly: now you want to ban handguns? you're liberal kama sutro. so many positions -- >> eric: on that note, what are the odds the media does their job in the next four years and reports the truth about the obama administration? we'll place our wagers next. ♪ ♪ [ ship horn blows ] no, no, no! stop! humans. one day we're coming up with the theory of relativity, the next... not so much. but that's okay -- you're covered with great ideas like optional better car replacement from liberty mutual insurance. total your car and we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. lea
clinging to their guns and religion. 99% of the gun violence is in the city. >> bob: they have three strikes you're out. >> greg: i'm talking about a federal law for handgun crime. why isn't omar abdel-rahman rahg about the 500 people that died in chicago. >> eric: he is inses tent to use the newtown massacre as the crisis that is not to be wasted. >> bob: not a bad idea either. the kids and you are talking actually about the national rifle -- freddie how many dead kids in philadelphia? >> kimberly: now you want to ban handguns? you're liberal kama sutro. so many positions -- >> eric: on that note, what are the odds the media does their job in the next four years and reports the truth about the obama administration? we'll place our wagers next. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> greg: so "usa today," the nation's official place mat for free continental breakfas breakfast, has not one, but two articles on how president obama should cope with the future scandals. the headline, similar. if you are falling over yourself to help the president to greatness, you can be forgiven for repetition. what are hea
in gold and religion. why spices. why were spices so valuable back then? it wasn't just that food was terrible in europe, it was. all the spices, each new exotic spice was thought to have certain properties, they might make you feel a bit more randy. how shall i put this? each of these new spices were the niagara of the day so that is one of the reasons his trade became so valuable. so after the conquest and colonization the settlers made fortunes exporting drugs back to europe and consuming them in this hemisphere as well and buy drugs i mean sugar which many people consider a drug, where we get rum from, definitely a drug, coffee, tobacco, and these aphrodisiac spices. these things became the developmental engine for hemispheric development. vast fortunes were created. think about where we are today, washington d.c. virginia, maryland. these were all drugs. the first time a lot of these drugs are introduced back to europe people looked at them with revulsion. tobacco. a bizarre thing. why would you put fire and smoke in your mouth? coffee was thought to be subversive. it had the
a shortcut and he was interested in gold and spending religion, but primarily it is about spaces. whatever space is so valuable that then? wasn't just the food was terrible in europe. and it was, but each new exotic spice was thought to have certain properties. each of these new spaces where the today. so that's one of the reasons by the trade became so valuable and people risk their lives to explore these themes. so after the conquest and colonization, exporting drugs back to europe in this hemisphere as well. by drugs i mean sugar, which many people consider a job, where we get from is definitely a drug. coffee, tobacco, tea and aphrodisiac spaces. these things became the developmental and system. vast fortunes were created. think about where we are today. what was the colonial economy? these are all drugs. .. and now we have turkish coffee, english tea time and of course of the fortunes that drove a lot in the european development. and so, long story short the reason have the world got colonized in some ways is because a bunch of old white men in europe couldn't get up so there you have
civic religion. radical still in much of the world but seemingly ordinary people can govern themselves. if we can't all agree on that and celebrate that, at least once every four years then there's something wrong with our culture >> brown: we have music. we have poetry. we got everything. >> everything, everything, wonderful >> and inclusiveness. that was the theme from beginning to end. people who often had been left out. were included. >> brown: all right. richard north and smith, annette gordon reed and beverly gauge, thank you all three >> thank you. >> ifill: and for the other news of this day, we turn to hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: there was word today that three americans died in the hostage stand-off in algeria that finally ended over the weekend. a u.s. official told the associated press that seven other americans escaped. it started wednesday when islamist militants linked to al- qaeda attacked a natural gas complex near the libyan border. algerian special forces then launched a series of operations to retake the site. today the prime minister gave his first official d
of religion. and so we have this enormous, tragic history that all of us confront from whatever our backgrounds are whether we're white, black, hispanic, asian, whether we're muslim, jew or christian. the notion that, in fact, in the words of a great writer who happened to win a nobel prize, william faulkner, he said the past is never dead and buried, it isn't even past. and i think that all of us are confronting constantly our history. we're confronting the history of slavery in this country. we're confronting the history and problems that arose as a consequence of colonialism. we're confronting those scars of violence and oppression and struggle and difficulty and hope not only on the larger canvas of history, but also within our own families. and for me it was not entirely obvious how, in fact, i was going to be able to integrate and pull together all those different strands in my life. so part of my challenge growing up was to figure out how do i function as someone who is black but also has white blood in me, how do i function as somebody who with is american and takes pride an
, that church would immediately declare itself the official religion of the united states of america. >> reporter: the masonic bible in a sense transcended denomination >> exactly. reporter: the story goes that washington took the oath on a random page, but vaughan thinks washington intentionally selected a passage from genesis. jacob blessing his 12 sons. where jacob blesseth his sons >> yes reporter: as a father blesses his children. where the father of our country took the oath. >> exactly. that's why it just seems to be too much you know, to be a random act >> reporter: if the bible had been randomly opened, where would it likely have been opened opened? >> here, the book of job. cheerful reading. >> reporter: yes, the book of job. you know, the one filled with disease, destruction and death. and that's not a very good foot to get off on. >> probably not. reporter: thankfully our new country fared much better and so did this bible. said to be present with washington at the ground-breaking of the u.s. capital and later at his funeral. >> in a way you could say it was on that book
they were born, regardless of their religion or their sexual orientation. those principles will direct our course as we introduce our first ten bills today, a tradition we've had in the united states senate. that is the majority party introduces the first ten bills. as we mend our broken immigration system, strengthen our schools and rebuild our roads and infrastructure we look to those measures in the bills. we balance the right to bear arms with regard to every right of children. we will balance spending reductions with revenue from the wealthiest among us. those principles will ensure military members never struggle for employment. those principles must be our guide. not a single piece of important legislation can pass the senate or become law without the votes of both democrats and republicans. so we'll be willing to compromise and work with our colleagues across the aisle. unfortunately, a number of bipartisan bills passed the senate during the last congress that were never acted upon by the house of representatives. so this year the senate will revisit some of those legislative prior
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)